Riddled around different areas of Fullerton are bright yellow Save Coyote Hills signs- a movement started by the Friends of Coyote Hills. Recently, alongside the City of Fullerton, Save Coyote Hills celebrated the acquisition of an additional 24 acres in late January with an $18 million deal.

A sign posted on the crossroads of Euclid & Rosecrans celebrating a recent requisition of land to add onto the 510 acres of Coyote Hills. Picture taken 3/1/22

A sign posted on the crossroads of Euclid & Rosecrans celebrating a recent requisition of land to add onto the 510 acres of Coyote Hills. Picture taken 3/1/22 Photo credit: Malia Arpon

Their celebration took place on the Norah Kuttner Trail, with over 100 guests in attendance. Amongst the supporters, Senator Josh Newman and Assemblymember Sharon Quirk-Silva attended to rejoice in the success of their contributions.

For centuries, the native wildlife accommodated within West Coyote Hills has flourished despite housing numerous oil drills.

Around the 1970s, following the oil boom in the region, Pacific Coast Homes, a Chevron subsidiary, sought to develop the newly used land for housing development.

Since 2001, Save Coyote Hills has fought to defend the remaining untouched land. Their goal is to preserve the biodiverse area against urban sprawl and industrial development.

Save Coyote Hill is categorized as a 501c3 non-profit organization through the Friend of Harbors, Beaches and Parks. They have also partnered with local organizations, including the California Native Plant Society, Hills for Everyone and the Southern California Botanists.

Community members have banded together to protect the unique ecosystem as a volunteer organization. Throughout the natural brush live four threatened plant communities and fifteen endangered species of birds, including the California quail.

The beginning of a trail that feeds into the hills in West Coyote Hills. Many trails begin of major streets.

The beginning of a trail that feeds into the hills in West Coyote Hills. Photo credit: Malia Arpon

For the past 17 years, the organization has successfully prevented any development on the land– though the fight is not over.

Currently spanning approximately 218 acres, West Coyote Hills is considered prime real estate. Surrounding housing developments predict what the region could turn into if Pacific Coast Homes were successful.

Coyote Hills provides an open area for Northern Orange County Residents to get fresh air. Likewise, it is an essential aspect of the San Gabriel River’s watershed system despite the extensive urbanization within the area.

In the past, Save Coyote Hills has curated protests, and monthly nature walks to raise awareness within the community.

During the onset of COVID-19, many Nature Walks were postponed and canceled due to California’s reopening plan. As of September 2021, Nature Walks have resumed and will continue on the second Saturday of each month.

The next Nature Walk will begin at 9 a.m. on Saturday, March 12, at Laguna Lake Park.

The sign on the corner of Euclid and Lakeview Dr taken on 3/1/2. This is where the Save Coyote Hills begins their monthly Nature Walks

The sign on the corner of Euclid and Lakeview Dr. This is where the Save Coyote Hills begins their monthly nature walks. Photo credit: Malia Arpon

Save Coyote Hills facilitates clean-up days on the third Saturday of each month for those who want to get their hands dirty. The group meets at 9 a.m. in the lower parking lot at Sunny Hills Church of Christ near the corner of Lakeview & Euclid.

For more information, visit their website.

Author profile