Fullerton College hosted a Veterans Day Ceremony via Zoom, honoring student veterans, staff, faculty, and administrators that have served our nation.

During the ceremony, campus safety led the presentation of colors, which is a ceremony that presents or retires a flag.

The ceremony had a large turnout of over 90 participants, although a majority were a part of faculty.

Fullerton College would normally have a wall honoring veterans in the quad but because of COVID, the event was held over Zoom.

Elaine Lipiz Gonzalez, Dean of Student Services, speaks of her own family who fought for basic human rights when they left their country.

Gonzalez’s family left Cuba to go to the U.S. and live a better life in America. Because of veterans, her and her family were able to have more opportunities and ultimately live a better life.

Prior to COVID, veterans were able to socialize inside the Veterans Resource Center.

Prior to COVID, veterans were able to socialize inside the Veterans Resource Center. Photo credit: Noah Jimerson

“We appreciate your tireless sacrifice,” said Gonzalez as she addressed all veterans on the call.

Dr. Nick Arman, who is a counselor and coordinator at the Veterans Resource Center at Fullerton College, spoke about all the different resources the school is providing for veterans.

Currently, Fullerton College has submitted a crime proposal to the Department of Education in hopes of being selected for a three-year grant cycle.

If Fullerton College is awarded this grant, the Veterans Resource Center will be able to provide even greater service to their veterans and military connected students.

Arman also said that there was a unanimous decision with the curriculum board to implement curricular changes.

“This will now enable student veterans to use their military service as credit for prior learning to meet general education requirements in the new Fullerton College Associated Degree,” said Arman.

Another resource Arman spoke of is HR 8337, which Congress passed this previous month.

It is not something that Fullerton College has changed personally, but it does affect their student veterans by expanding their benefits with their courses.

“With the passing of HR 8337, now veterans will continue to receive full VH benefits while taking all of their courses remotely,” said Arman. Which is something that wasn’t previously done before.

Last year, a wall display was put up in the quad at Fullerton College that honored our veterans.

Last year, a wall display was put up in the quad at Fullerton College that honored our veterans. Photo credit: Veterans Resource Center

Keynote speaker, David Robles, is the AS President at Fullerton College and a U.S. Navy veteran.

Robles served the Navy for eight years as a missile technician who was able to be a part of a couple missile launches.

“I was concerned about going back to school. I was feeling a little like Billy Madison but after visiting the veterans resource center, my perspective was changed,” said Robles.

Robles speaks highly of the veteran resource center and how much they’ve helped guide him in the right path.

Now Robles is an English major at Fullerton College who is hoping to transfer to USC.

His success story was used as an example of what Fullerton College can do and has done to support their veterans throughout their educational journey.

“From fall of 2019 to present, Fullerton College has been and is the home to 1,368 self-identified veterans. This makes us one of the largest campuses serving military connected students in Southern California,” said Arman.

Author profile